THE LOST BOOK OF NOSTRADAMUS
PLATE # 21

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In this image we see the following objects for consideration:
1) a pope
2) a dove
3) a snake or serpent
4) standard with emblem of 'keys to heaven'

  The Dove was once believed to represent the Holy Ghost/Spirit, but is this the true meaning? If it were, there wre many sacrifices offered that consisted of killing doves. Seems hardly a symbol of the Holy Spirit if you want to kill it. The Dove, on the other hand, represented a female, more specifically, the Queen Mother or Mother Goddess.
I believe the DOVE represents a woman in these images - and here in plate 21, the dragon [serpent] wants to devour the woman. The woman in this case does not represent the Roman church, but rather, it represents the true representitive of the kingdom of heaven. Whereas, the pope holds a banner with the emblem of the 'keys to heaven' - hate to break it to these popes but their keys will only fit one place and that isn't heaven.
The serpent represents the church here.


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The Dove By Norman A. Rubin
"In the Ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman world, birds ... mainly doves (1) ... were charged with complex symbolic significance as manifestations of the Godhead. In the Ancient Near East, the dove was a symbol of a female deity of love and fecundity: Ishtar, Astarte, Tanit, Anat, ‘Ata, and Atargis. To the Ancient Greeks, the dove was perceived as Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty, and thus also invested with erotic connotations. As an attribute of the fertility goddess, the dove became a symbol of love between human beings, and between the deity and the worshipers. The Cyprians believed that Aphrodite (Anadomyne) rose from the sea, as she was born from an egg, brooded by a dove, and finally pushed ashore by a fish. White doves were well regarded during the Roman period, and were depicted in various forms of mosaics. The Romans sacrificed doves to Venus, the goddess of love and fertility. Ovid and others wrote about riding in a dove-drawn chariot. Roman worship of Venus was, to a large extent, derived from the Phoenician sanctuary Eryx, where the dove was revered by the goddess Astarte. The dove was also considered sacred to Adonis and Bacchus as the "First Begotten of Love." In later history, Giovana de Medici adopted two caged turtle-doves as her symbol to represent conjugal fidelity. In ancient Levant, doves were sacred to all great Mothers and Queens, and of Heaven, the mother of all, who nourished the earth. "In the heavens I take my place and send rain, on the earth I take my place and cause the green to spring forth." From Mesopotamia to the Greco-Roman world, the Great Mother was seen as the symbol of fertility, the renewal of life for both man and the fruits of the earth. Babylon was the city of the dove. There, the goddess Semiramis was symbolized as a dove ... the form she was supposed to have assumed on leaving the earth." Source: http://www.christusrex.org/www1/ofm/mag/MAen9905.html

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