THE LOST BOOK OF NOSTRADAMUS PLATE # 26
MY INTERPRETATION OF THIS PLATE WILL BE AT THE BOTTOM OF PAGE
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Plate 26 is not very clear on the animal so I have added another depiction of this same plate below the original plate. It is indeed a bear.

In this plate there are only two subjects to address:
1) A Pope and  2) a Bear presenting himself in a very obvious way to the Pope.

The Pope in general represents the Catholic Church during the period of the Protestant Reformation.
Just as a bear poses a great threat to life and limb, this Bear depicts the threat to the Church from the Reformation - the Bear represents the Reformation.

In Heraldry a Bear = Strength, cunningness, ferocity in the protection of one's kindred and ideas.
Berlin, Germany is also represented by the bear, and from out of Germany comes the Protestant Reformation
via Martin Luther of Germany, John Calvin of France, and John Knox of Scotland, to name the greatest reformers.

"The Ninety-Five Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences, commonly known as The Ninety-Five Theses, were written by Martin Luther in 1517 and are widely regarded as the primary catalyst for the Protestant Reformation. Luther used these theses to display his displeasure with some of the Church's clergy's abuses, most notably the sale of indulgences; this ultimately gave birth to Protestantism. Luther's popularity encouraged others to share their doubts about the Church and to protest against its ways; it especially challenged the teachings of the Church on the nature of penance, the authority of the Pope and the usefulness of indulgences. They sparked a theological debate that would result in the Reformation and the birth of the various Lutheran, Reformed, and Anabaptist denominations within Christianity."

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The first Holy Roman Emperor was Otto the Great in 962 C.E., the last was Francis II. Napoleon Boneparte dissolved the Holy Roman Empire in 1806 during the Napoleonic Wars. Three cheers for Napoleon.